1994 Razorback Basketball Team, 11 Individuals Inducted into the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame

Arkansans long will remember the night of Monday, April 4, 1994.

1994 NCAA Championship Team

The national championship was on the line when a 6-6 junior named Scotty Thurman hit the most famous shot in University of Arkansas basketball history with 51 seconds left. Thurman’s three-point shot snapped a 70-70 tie against Duke. Arkansas went on to win the national championship, 76-72, over a Duke team that was playing in its sixth Final Four in seven years and its fourth championship game. Corliss Williamson, a Russellville native, was named the tournament’s most outstanding player.

Thurman, Williamson, their teammates and coaches were honored Feb. 3 when the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame’s Class of 2012 was inducted during the organization’s annual induction banquet at Verizon Arena in North Little Rock.

This is the second time in its history for the Hall of Fame to induct a team. The 1964 national championship Razorback football team was inducted in 2010.

The man who coached the 1994 Arkansas basketball team, Nolan Richardson, was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998. Thurman was inducted in 2010, and Williamson was inducted in 2009.

One of the individual inductees in the Class of 2012, meanwhile, is Lee Mayberry, who joined with Todd Day to lead Arkansas to the 1990 Final Four in Denver, where the Hogs lost in the national semifinals to Duke. Day was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008.

The Hall of Fame Class of 2012 consists of six people from the regular category, three from the senior category and two from the posthumous category.

In addition to Mayberry, those being inducted from the regular category were former Oaklawn Park track announcer Terry Wallace, former Newport High School head football coach Bill Keedy, former Razorback basketball player U.S. Reed, former Razorback football player “Light Horse” Harry Jones and Little Rock native and former Oklahoma State University head football coach Pat Jones.

Those being inducted from the senior category were former Forrest City star athlete Elmer “B” Lindsey, former college coach and NFL scout Bob Ford of Wynne and former Southern Arkansas University women’s basketball coach Margaret Downing.

Those being inducted from the posthumous category were former University of Central Arkansas head football coach Raymond Bright and 1892 Kentucky Derby winning jockey Alonzo “Lonnie” Clayton.

The Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame inducted its first class in 1959. Andrew Meadors of Little Rock is the organization’s president, and Ray Tucker serves as the executive director.

The Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame Museum on the west side of Verizon Arena is open each Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. It includes an 88-seat theater with a video highlighting the careers of Arkansas sports greats and a touch-screen kiosk with a database of all Hall of Fame inductees.

Members of the Hall of Fame vote each year on inductees. Membership dues are $50 annually. Membership forms can be obtained here.

The Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2012 consists of:

Regular Category

Harry Jones

Harry Jones (#23)

Harry Jones – The Enid, Okla., native lettered for the Razorback football team from 1964-66. He was an All-Southwest Conference selection in 1965 and developed a national reputation for his breakaway runs on offense, earning the nickname “Light Horse.” He played safety on the 1964 national championship team, ending the season with 44 tackles and two interceptions. During the 1965-66 seasons, Jones rushed 166 times for 974 yards and seven touchdowns. He also caught 29 passes for 598 yards and five touchdowns. He was the first Razorback to grace the cover of Sports Illustrated following Arkansas’ 1965 win over Texas. Jones was selected in the first round of the 1967 NFL draft by the Philadelphia Eagles and played for the Eagles from 1967-70.

Pat Jones

Pat Jones – The future coach developed an interest in football while growing up in Little Rock. He was a lineman for the Forrest Heights Eagles in junior high, a guard for the Hall High Warriors in high school and a linebacker and nose guard for the Arkansas Tech Wonder Boys in college before transferring to the University of Arkansas. Jones was the head coach at Oklahoma State from 1984-94 after having served five years as an assistant under Jimmy Johnson. His teams compiled a 62-60-3 record and went 3-1 in bowl games. During the five-year stretch from 1984 through 1988, the Cowboys were 44-15 with records of 10-2 in ‘84, 8-4 in ’85, 6-5 in ’86, 10-2 in ’87 and 10-2 in ’88. Oklahoma State won the Gator Bowl after the ’84 season, won the Sun Bowl after the ’87 season and won the Holiday Bowl following the ’88 season. Jones coached nine All-America players at Oklahoma State and later was an assistant coach for the Miami Dolphins and Oakland Raiders under Johnson, Dave Wannstadt and Norv Turner.

Bill Keedy

Bill Keedy – A Newport native, Keedy attended Arkansas State University and is still a member of the radio broadcast team for Red Wolf football games. Keedy had a successful run as the head football coach at Paragould High School in the early 1970s. Following the 1975 season, he went to Sylvan Hills. After just one season as the head coach there, he returned to his hometown of Newport in 1977. Keedy compiled a 175-48-3 record at Newport before retiring. His overall record as a high school head coach was 199-55-4. He was the district coach of the year 17 times, and his teams reached the playoffs 19 times. Newport won state championships under his leadership in 1981 and 1991. Greyhound teams also reached the championship games of 1988 and 1989. Newport made it as far as the semifinals eight times. Keedy, who was a member of the high school all-star coaching staff 10 times, was later inducted into the Arkansas High School Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

Lee Mayberry

Lee Mayberry – Nolan Richardson recruited Mayberry out of Will Rogers High School at Tulsa, where he had led his team to the 1988 state championship. Mayberry scored 1,940 points in his college career at Arkansas. Mayberry, one of the best point guards in school history, was an All-Southwest Conference selection in 1990 and 1991 and an All-Southeastern Conference selection in 1992. The four teams Mayberry played on at Arkansas had a combined record of 115-24 and made the NCAA Tournament all four seasons. The Razorbacks were 25-7 his freshman season, 30-5 his sophomore year, 34-4 his junior year and 26-8 his senior season. Mayberry was selected in the first round of the 1992 NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks. He played from 1992-96 for the Bucks and from 1996-99 for the Vancouver Grizzlies. For the first four years of his NBA career, Mayberry played in 328 consecutive games, never missing a regular season game.

US Reed

U.S. Reed – If Thurman made the most famous shot in Razorback basketball history, the second most famous was almost certainly made by U.S. Reed. He hit a shot from just past the half-court line at the horn in the second round of the NCAA Tournament in Austin in 1981 as Arkansas defeated the defending national champions from Louisville, 74-73. Arkansas lost its next game in the tournament to LSU at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, but Reed’s shot in Austin will always live in Razorback lore. Reed helped lead Pine Bluff to a state championship in 1977 and was part of the Razorback team that made it to the 1978 Final Four. Reed, a guard, was a starter by his sophomore year. The Razorbacks made the regional finals of the NCAA Tournament in 1979 before losing to an Indiana State team led by Larry Bird. In 1979, Reed played on the U.S. team that won a gold medal at the World University Games. The four Razorback teams on which Reed played went 32-4, 25-5, 21-8 and 24-8, making the NCAA Tournament all four seasons.

Terry Wallace

Terry Wallace – One of the most recognizable voices in Arkansas belongs to Terry Wallace, who retired from the announcer’s booth at Oaklawn Park this spring after 37 consecutive seasons. Wallace was known for trademark lines such as “here they come into the short stretch of the mile run” and “picking ‘em up and laying ‘em down.” He set the record for consecutive race calls. He hit the 20,000 mark with his call of the third race on March 25, 2010. Wallace ended the streak at 20,191 calls without a miss following the fourth race on Jan. 28 of this year. Through the years, he called races of such greats as Zenyatta, Rachel Alexandra, Curlin, Azeri, Cigar, Afleet Alex, Smarty Jones, Sunny’s Halo and Temperence Hill. Larry Collmus, the track announcer at Gulfstream Park and Monmouth Park, said: “When someone says Oaklawn, the first thing that comes to mind is Terry Wallace.”

Senior category

Margaret Downing – One of the true pioneers in the history of women’s basketball in Arkansas, Downing was the head coach at Southern Arkansas University from 1965-84. Her Riderettes won eight Arkansas Women’s Intercollegiate Sports Association titles. She also coached teams to several state Amateur Athletic Union championships in the years before AWISA. The Waldo native was an innovator and a promoter of women’s basketball, serving on committees and associations at the state and national levels. She was associated with the U.S. Olympic Committee, the U.S. Girls Basketball League and the U.S. Junior Olympic Basketball Committee through the years.

Bob Ford – As a center and linebacker, Ford helped guide Wynne to the state championship in 1950. He was awarded a football scholarship to what’s now the University of Memphis and was the team’s most valuable player as an end in 1954. After service in the U.S. Army from 1956-58, Ford joined the staff of fellow Arkansas native Paul “Bear” Bryant at the University of Alabama and served on Bryant’s staff for three seasons. Ford coached at the University of Georgia during the 1961 season and was the defensive coordinator for the University of Kentucky in 1962. After spending the 1963 season as a player personnel employee for the Dallas Cowboys, Ford coached in 1964-65 at Kentucky, in 1966 at Mississippi State University and in 1967-69 as the freshman coach under Frank Broyles at Arkansas. Ford began practicing law in Wynne in 1970 but spent 25 years as a part-time player scout for the Dallas Cowboys.

Elmer “B” Lindsey – Old-timers in east Arkansas will tell you that one of the best high school backfields in the state’s history was the one in 1957 at Forrest City that included “B” Lindsey, Sonny Holmes, Dan Wilford and Clinton Gore. Forrest City was a power in those days, going 77-36-7 from 1954-64. Lindsey played on an undefeated team in 1957, scoring 22 touchdowns as a halfback despite a broken hand. He scored 44 touchdowns in a high school career that saw the three teams on which he played post a combined 30-2 record. He also starred in basketball, baseball and track at Forrest City. He was Broyles’ first football signee at Arkansas but chose instead to sign a baseball contract with the St. Louis Cardinals. His signing bonus was believed to have been more than $50,000, the most ever offered to an Arkansas player to that point. Lindsey played in the Cardinal organization for six seasons. After those six years in the minor leagues, Lindsey returned to St. Francis County to operate his family’s farming interests.

Posthumous category

Raymond Bright – He excelled as a football coach and track coach at Conway High School and the University of Central Arkansas. After playing on UCA’s 1947 championship football team, Bright began his coaching career in 1949 at Conway Junior High School and was later the athletic director, head football coach and head track coach at Conway High School. He went to what was then Arkansas State Teachers College in 1958. Bright was the head football coach at UCA from 1965-71. His 1965 and 1966 teams both earned shares of the Arkansas Intercollegiate Conference championship. Bright left coaching following the 1971 season. He later served as UCA’s director of housing. Bright previously was inducted into the Arkansas Track and Field Hall of Fame and the UCA Sports Hall of Fame.

Alonzo “Lonnie” Clayton – Born in 1876, Clayton moved with his family to Pulaski County when he was 10. He attended school while working as an errand boy to earn extra money for his family. He left home at the age of 12 in 1888 to join his older brother, Albertus, a jockey in Chicago. He soon was working as an exercise rider at stables owned by racing legend E.J. “Lucky” Baldwin. Clayton became one of only two 15-year-old jockeys to ever win the Kentucky Derby. Aboard Azra, he came from behind in the stretch to win the derby by a nose in May 1892. He was later second in 1893, third in 1895 and second in 1897 in the Kentucky Derby. To provide for a family that included eight siblings in Arkansas, Clayton bought property and built a home in what’s now North Little Rock in 1892. The home, located at 2105 Maple St., still stands. At the peak of his career in 1895, Clayton posted 144 wins and was in the money in 403 of 688 races.

 

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